Today's highly competitive talent economy demands that successful companies differentiate themselves from the pack in more complicated ways. Central to this is being able to understand and positively impact the experience of its employees.

👫 This post is aimed at
People in HR or team managers who are looking for a solid understanding when it comes to employee experience and the use of data and analytics.
📖 After reading
You will know what to focus on, and why, during the process of establishing such a culture and dealing with its challenges.

Organizations today increasingly invest in trying to shape their employees’ experience, aiming to create experiences that meet employees at every touchpoint in the talent lifecycle. However, improving the employee experience is the end game, but getting there requires a data-driven approach, including continuous listening, cross-functional data-sharing, and people analytics. This article discusses each of these conditions more in depth, including references to my previous posts in this area.

What is the employee experience?

  1. Different definitions and views across the literature and organizations
  2. Today, many organizations and authors herald the potential benefits of an employee-centric strategy. Still, a variety of different definitions are being used across the literature to define ‘the employee experience’, with some authors equaling the concept to employee engagement, and still, others seeing it as primarily related to service delivery satisfaction.

    In line with different views and definitions, numerous ideas exist on how to ‘create’ positive employee experiences, with most organizations approaching it as a digital issue, starting their transformation by investing in digital apps and tools. Despite various opinions, there is precious little scientific certainty around how to build great work environments, cultivate high-performing teams, maximize productivity, or enhance happiness.

  3. It’s about perceptions – shaped by different environments
  4. Less disputable is that the word “perception” is often at the heart of definitions. Employee experience is not about what actually happened; rather, it’s about what is perceived, understood, and remembered by the employee. Hence, it’s not just a factor of what an organization throws at its employees; it’s how they perceive and interpret it. This critical nature implies that employee experience transformations should not begin with a piece of game-changing technology. They should begin and end with a thorough understanding of employee perceptions – capturing and analyzing direct, indirect or inferred feedback (see later).

    The most comprehensive view on shaping the employee experience in my view has been developed by Jacob Morgan, one of the leading experts in the field of employee experience. Following numerous interviews with respected business leaders across the world, he defined employee experience as being essentially comprised of three environments:

    The physical environment: Office space, meeting rooms, restaurant, building accessibility and parking space.

    The cultural environment: Values, attitudes, sense of purpose employees feel, leadership perception and the mission of the organization.

    The technological environment: The tools employees use to interact with the (HR) organization and get their jobs done (e.g., internal social network, mobile devices, laptops, desktops or apps).

    Although some of its components may closely link to culture, I would argue that work conditions, including aspects such as workload (physical, mental or emotional), terms of employment (e.g., remuneration, job security, career opportunities), working relations (communication, relationship with colleagues) and workplace flexibility would be a valuable complement to that list.

  5. What creates a positive experience is personal
  6. What employees need to enhance their work-related experience may strongly depend on a variety of different factors, including the stage in their career, what kind of work they do, or what motivates them as a person. What constitutes a meaningful touch point in the employee journey also changes over the course of an employee’s life. For a young parent, providing child daycare or organizing family days may be a critical component shaping the experience, while the same sort of services wouldn’t necessarily satisfy a senior executive.

Three basic conditions to understand, track and improve the employee experience

Given the critical nature of (i.e., perceptions and personal) and the different environments that shape the employee experience, I believe that understanding, tracking and effectively improving the employees’ experience requires (1) a continuous listening strategy, (2) cross-functional data-sharing and (3) investing in analytical skills or strategic partnerships. Without these being in place, efforts are likely to end up having clear costs and unclear results.

  1. Condition 1: Continuous listening

    A continuous listening strategy

    Understanding your employees is crucial to your ability to consistently provide an excellent employee experience and compete on talent attraction, performance and retention. Unfortunately, it’s been my experience that most companies or HR leaders think they know what their employees’ want—and more often than not they are either partially correct or incomplete. Either scenario results with a cascading effect that degrades employee experience objectives and investments. The negative financial impact that incurs is a significant hidden loss than goes unrecognized by most business leaders.

    In the area of marketing and sales, voice of the customer programs have become an established path to delivering enhanced customer experiences and driving business change. In the same line, HR organizations today need to develop better ways to understand their workforce. Because employees’ needs and expectations differ and change over time, the way feedback is obtained must be in accordance with those shifts.

    This is why continuous listening programs should be a priority for organizations; programs through which organizations collect and analyze employee feedback to identify insights that are used to improve the employee experience and eventually, business outcomes.

    Thanks to advances in technology, collecting these sorts of feedback to understand what employees want and how they want it is much easier than before. Indeed, numerous technologies and apps exist to allow for almost constant ‘checking in’ on your workforce. Similarly, advances in data analytics and web technologies (such as social networking and blogs) allow organizations to mine the experience from their employees.

    However, when collecting data, don’t get trapped in becoming more focused on the data than on the impact the information will have. Frequent feedback collection is important, but it needs to be relevant, robust and consistent. In my article ‘Why Data-Driven Employee Experience Should Include a Continuous Listening Strategy’, I outlined some tips and tricks on how to intelligently address some of the core challenges related to continuous listening and ensure you get the best out of your investments.

    Feedback sources

    To get a complete, unbiased view of what employees really find and value, it is critical to gather and analyze all forms of employee feedback, whether that feedback is direct (what people say when they are being asked), indirect (what people say without explicitly being asked) or inferred (how people behave). You may find that different types of conversations generate very different insight.

    Direct feedback: What employees tell you when you initiate a specific conversation (surveys) or when they initiate a conversation through one of the company channels (e.g., via phone calls, email, chat). With regards to surveys, I like to make a distinction between employee relationship surveys on the one hand, and transactional surveys on the other hand – as they are typically owned and managed by different departments.

    Relationship surveys: any survey that explicitly solicits feedback on employee's general engagement and perceptions of leadership, culture and organizational health.

    Transactional surveys: Typically, a survey on how satisfied the employee is with a certain (operational) service interaction (e.g., ticket handling). A transactional survey may follow for instance each service call to assess satisfaction or progress.

    Indirect feedback: Indirect feedback refers to instances when the employee is speaking about the company but does not necessarily have the intention to give feedback. It refers to what employees tell others about you through their communities, social networks, and the web.

    Inferred feedback: Inferred feedback identifies how a tool or service is used to achieve a desired outcome with effectiveness and efficiency. This is typically derived from transactional, behavioral and operational data associated with the employee experience or journey across different touch points. Examples of inferred data include HR contact center data, clicks, views, or number of calls to the HR service center related to a certain issue.

    In order to get a meaningful view on the employee experience and how to improve it, these different types of feedback need to complement each other. A rising or falling score in employee satisfaction with a certain service transaction doesn’t in itself reveal what is driving the trend. Operational data may then provide an objective comparison to self-reported employee feedback and be used to identify specific pain points that lead to perceptions of poor experience.

    Similarly, operational and behavioral data may be difficult to interpret by themselves or be less relevant without being able to link them to overall employee engagement or satisfaction scores. Poor hand-offs between steps in a journey can leave the employee satisfied with individual interactions, but still frustrated with the overall experience being delivered.

  2. Condition 2: Cross-functional data-sharing

    Shaping the employee experience using these different sorts of feedback across the employee lifecycle represents a radical change in many HR organizations, where gathering employee feedback typically mirrors organizational structure: communication departments gather input on intranet usage or sentiment, HR service delivery examines transactional and user experience data and the people analytics department (increasingly) is responsible for employee survey management. This leads to the inability to drive holistic change and will ultimately produce a disjointed experience for your employees.

    Each HR unit gathers information via its own methodologies and for its own use, stranding critical information in silos and depriving companies the benefit of getting a cross-functional 360-degree view on the employee.

    The emergence of employee experience programs should bring some radical changes to this. As outlined earlier in this article, the employee experience is shaped by different environments, and therefore understanding it requires integrating and analyzing data capturing perceptions and behaviors across culture, technology, physical environment and work conditions.

    For most organizations, managing the employee experience through a single view – that includes unified feedback data – is perceived as a difficult area requiring huge investment. It doesn’t have to be. Today, organizations can combine data collected from HR service delivery systems with survey and other employee data, conduct analyses of both individual and aggregate responses in real time, and then automatically route and track issues needing resolution.

    Instead, the biggest challenge will be in the way different departments work together. To secure success, check out my article ‘The Number 1 Challenge to Data-driven Employee Experience Success and How to Start Addressing it’, in which I share 3 tips to promote cross-functional data-sharing and integration and get the best out of your transformational efforts.

  3. Condition 3: Expertise in or partnerships in people and HR analytics

    Having a continuous listening and cross-functional data-sharing program in place is only as good as your ability to translate different data into relevant insights and actions towards the employee experience. In my article ‘Why HR Analytics is Critical to Employee Experience Success’ I outlined three ways how HR analytics will deliver a significant value in delivering and sustaining experiences that truly engage your best employees and can add value to the business:

    Employee segmentation: Apply clustering techniques to identify groups of employees with similar needs/preferences or with different drivers of satisfaction across touch points.

    Targeting and prioritizing investments: Use analytics to determine the current and potential value of employees and determine who to target with which initiative, in which channel, and when. Similarly, proactively determine which employees are at risk of poor engagement or leaving the organization and what tactics are most likely to keep them engaged or want to stay. All these insights can be used to understand where and how to allocate resources more intelligently and maximize ROI.

    Understanding and demonstrating value: Linking experience and satisfaction data with HR and business-critical metrics will show what works, for whom and why (which drivers contribute to success).

    Therefore, make sure to invest in building the right analytical capabilities when transforming to a more employee-centric organization. Alternatively, if your organization doesn’t have the right capabilities to perform advanced analytics on a broader set of integrated data, make sure to invest in a strategic partnership with a provider that has a deep understanding of advanced people analytics and can help you to get the insights needed.

Conclusion

Unless your company understands the personal and subjective employee experiences across different environments and the role every function plays in shaping them, employee experience is more a slogan than an attainable goal. Improving the employee experience is the end game, but getting there requires, continuous listening, feedback from multiple channels and functions, integrated to give a holistic picture of the employee lifecycle. Only with these three conditions in place, your organization will be able to understand where to invest and how to maximize employee value through dynamic, personalized treatment.

Are you looking to move from doing what is simply interesting, new, or easy to what will actually make a meaningful, positive impact on an employee’s experience and business outcomes? I'm happy to help designing a pragmatic approach to capture, integrate and analyze the employee experience across different environment and all channels of interaction.

How intuo grows with intuo

INTUO

How intuo grows with intuo

This is a little story about how we use our own platform and how it has changed our dynamic. In a way, we are our own product's best test audience. If you're thinking now “Booo, sales pitch”, you'd be mistaken. I do want to assure you that I’m not going to try to tell you a picture-perfect story in order to create more inbound leads. Nope. It's just about our challenges accompanied with the milestones and small and big victories that have nurtured the growth of the entire intuo team.
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This is a little story about how we use our own platform and how it has changed our dynamic. In a way, we are our own product's best test audience. If you're thinking now “Booo, sales pitch”, you'd be mistaken. I do want to assure you that I’m not going to try to tell you a picture-perfect story in order to create more inbound leads. Nope. It's just about our challenges accompanied with the milestones and small and big victories that have nurtured the growth of the entire intuo team.

A tough nut to crack

A culture of praise is not something you can achieve in a day. The initial resistance (and reluctance) to post praises publicly on the platform was pretty high, even though everyone was well aware of the wonders and impact of good recognition. It started with constantly reminding ourselves of its importance and getting accustomed with the fuzzy "goosebumps" when you genuinely compliment someone.

When talking about resistance, there is one person I have to mention in particular: Our COO, Gilles. Even though he's a co-founder and he firmly believes in the impact intuo can make, he is not really the most open person. Some would even call him a bit skeptical and somewhat indifferent at times. For instance, he is more comfortable with giving and receiving feedback rather than recognition. We used to label him as a "hard nut to crack.” However, over the course of a couple of months, this had changed.

Gilles, our COO and resident "tough nut to crack"

We started with baby steps. A couple of people started to post the things that we told in person onto the platform, creating a habit out of it. The power of this behavior is that everyone in the company was able to take notice of it, reducing the threshold bit by bit. You could start to feel that people wanted to get in on the whole "recognize my work" trend that was going on. After a while, the majority of our company was logging their appraisal in our platform and everyone also became more comfortable with sharing compliments in real life. It really turned into a "thing we just do around here."

The intuo platform had given the intuo people a pair of eyes that were able to see the efforts of others and a voice that could express recognition for them. Even for Gilles. Everyone was surprised to see his first praise on the platform. Sure, it was a one-liner, but everyone starts small right? As of today, we can't say he has become a praise guru of any kind, but that's fine. The important thing is he went from zero to not zero, which is a rise of 100% in terms of value to the company and its people. Intuo is designed to facilitate, not to dictate. As long as recognition happens when it's due, and it's genuine, then it's mission accomplished for us.

Arne with some genuine appraisal during our Q3 meeting

The intuoversity

Our own Learn module was initially mainly used for onboarding new team members. It's where we store all our knowledge and wisdom about the New World of Work and how we pass on that knowledge.

As time allowed it, we started to find more and more ways to fully integrate our learning platform in our daily operations. We log product updates, turn useful articles into courses, best practices, etc. We even have a complete course on our nearest competitors, to always make sure we're on top of things.

We go exploring every day, taking input and feedback from any angle.

One of our strengths is that intuo consists of a lot of relatively young team members who are always thirsty for more knowledge. We are curious about the future of the HR industry, how SaaS businesses function, how to develop their good leadership… So we tend to self-educate quite a lot. But it doesn't end there. Thanks to our platform and everyone contributing to it, we are well aware of the power of sharing knowledge. It's one thing to know about something, but breaking it down into key takeaways and distributing that knowledge opened the door to a whole other level of education. It became a social behavior where everyone was looking out for each other's knowledge as well.

As a result, our very own intuoversity was founded.

Every Thursday or Friday during lunch, everyone will come together and a volunteer will teach us something. It can be anything, not necessarily on the topic of talent management. One lunch we're trying to complete a puzzle in small groups without talking, another we leave the room with the five most frequently used Comp&Ben tracks of organizations.

Afterwards, our dear dean Max will post a summary of what we've learned onto the platform. This way people who couldn't make it are being kept in the loop and new people have an extensive library of knowledge at their disposal. Want a key take away from all of this? Make and keep learning exciting. Everyone likes to learn, that's a fact. What really decides if it actually happens or not, is the way it is done.

Tim giving this week's Intuoversity class

Intuo hearts intuo

A company culture is not created overnight. It takes a lot of conscientious effort to engage teams and nurture habits within people. Leading by example is vital to make anything succeed. Whether it's to cultivate the culture of praise and feedback or to encourage continuous learning... to do anything really. Let people experience the benefits, stimulate the behavior, and good things will come of it.

We are intuo's biggest fans. That's kind of a "duh" thing to say, but it's the truth. We see so much potential in the platform and experience the power on a daily basis that it's hard not to get excited by the possibilities that lie ahead. Not just for us, but for everyone who's using it. Yes, there is still much territory left undiscovered, but it would be wrong to see this as anything but an opportunity. We go exploring every day, taking input and feedback from any angle. Give us your best shot when it comes to ideas, and we'll give ours at realizing them.

And now if you'll excuse me, I have an intuoversity class on Artificial Intelligence waiting for me.

Performance Enablement at Barco

Expert Knowledge

Performance Enablement at Barco

Barco is an international, award winning company in display technology, that promotes investing a lot of time and effort in its talent. Sam De Potter is the Director of HR Processes and Projects there, thus we wanted to pick his brain about his vision on Performance Management and the future HR landscape.
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Barco is an international, award winning company in display technology, that promotes investing a lot of time and effort in its talent. Sam De Potter is the Director of HR Processes and Projects there, thus we wanted to pick his brain about his vision on Performance Management and the future HR landscape.

The engagement quandary

The business world is bursting with engagement numbers. Employees are no longer engaged, and everyone is looking at HR to blame. Yet this perspective is outdated according to Sam. “Employee engagement is too easily seen as HR material. Of course HR can support certain initiatives to monitor the engagement levels of the company, yet it all starts and ends with the business itself.”

And we believe Sam has a valid point. It’s the team leader himself that works closest with its team members on a daily basis. If someone has a clear view on the wellbeing and engagement of the employees it’s him, and not the HR department. Then why is everyone still looking at HR when someone leaves the company abruptly? The engagement levels should in fact be included in the role of the team leaders in the organization.

Performance Enablement

“There is a lot of confusion about the term Performance Management” he starts. “People wrongly tend to limit Performance Management to setting goals and evaluating those goals at the end of the year, with an additional possible link to bonuses or a salary raise”.

At Barco, they take it a few steps further. They don’t just talk about “Performance Management”, they prefer the term “Performance Enablement”. “The employee is motivated to ask certain things from the business to perform at his best, and will then in his turn make an effort to perform at his very best to help the business to advance successfully”. It is thus not so much a one-way, but more a two-way process. Because objectives are only the beginning at Barco. Setting goals is one thing, enabling the employee to achieve them, is the ultimate goal. Together with the employee they define development actionables to make sure the person stays growing, together with the business, so that this person is even better equipped for future challenges.

Three main HR challenges

Yet Sam does see a few challenges ahead for Performance Management as it is positioned today. “A first challenge is the uncertainty about the process you have in place. How will one ever know if the Performance Management process supports and facilitates the strategy of the business?”. A PM process should not be there “just because HR wants intel on certain data”. It should actively contribute to the selling process or the efficiency of the organization.

“A second challenge in the HR space, is the search for a tool to support all your processes, in a way that’s simple and understable, without taking up too much time”. The purpose of an HR tool is that it reduces the amount of time spent on administration and all kinds of paperwork. It should thus not be more time consuming to insert or retrieve data into/from the tool, than it is to do it offline yourself. Otherwise, you’re just implementing another tool. And this is an underestimated problem. You shouldn’t just buy a tool, just for the sake of buying a tool when it doesn’t alleviate any pain or doesn’t make your processes more efficient.

Sam also poses a final challenge: ”Organizations don’t have a strong integrated HR policy”. Companies collect data from several domains, but do they use all of the information gathered or does it end in a big black digital dungeon where nobody ever goes back to look for something? It’s a tendency that almost every business has and is of no benefit to any party. Bits and pieces of information are scattered everywhere and ends up nowhere.

What’s next?

In conclusion, we asked Sam how he believes the future of work has an impact on the responsibility of the HR departments. “In the future, more and more people will start working on an independent basis, doing projects for companies, instead of actually being on the payroll. This is a phenomenon that is only gonna pop up more frequently. As a consequence, people who work within your company for only a few months, don’t exactly fit anymore in the annual performance management cycle.” These employees receive feedback and have (or haven’t) obtained certain objectives or skills. When they move on to the next employee, what happens to that information? “Right now, it all stays at the company in question, which is bizarre. The philosophy of many organizations is to offer continuous learning to all employees, which stands for enabling people to improve in their current job, but also preparing them for future jobs, even if that means a job outside the organization”.

There should be something similar to a patient file in the medical industry. Different doctors usually have access to relevant information about the patient, like previous surgery or allergies. The same principle would go for the business world; some kind of digital backpack that people bring with them that goes beyond the few lines on people’s resume.

Thanks Sam for the insights!

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Performance reviews. They either send your team running for the hills or... Well, that's probably about it. Employees look forward to performance reviews just about as much as a triple root canal and managers tend to view them as yet another burdensome task HR has forced upon them.

👫 This post is aimed at
Anyone who is having doubts about the effectiveness of traditional performance reviews.
📖 After reading
You'll have a better understanding of the negative impact they can possibly have and how to veer away from them.


While that has never been the intention of these sessions, it's what the reality has become for many. And considering even Jack Welch used the term "rank and yank" in reference to performance reviews, it's no wonder these can be negatively-viewed and anxiety-ridden events.

So maybe it's time to ditch the traditional performance review and implement a more modern take. Here's where they can fall short and what you can do to break away and move forward.

The Negatives

Perform an impromptu survey of employees and managers and you'll quickly have a handful of reasons why performance reviews are viewed in such a negative light. The issues can run deep, but here are just a few that barely scratch the surface:

They can spend too much time in the past

Many employers only conduct reviews annually. So in just a one-hour meeting (or less), the manager has to cover a year's worth of employee performance plus cite specific examples, provide short- and long-term goals, offer resources, etc. It's a lot of ground to cover in a short time.

And the real clincher here is that managers can fall into the trap of looking too heavily at past behavior — and often honing in unnecessarily on negative behavior to boot. If a manager is on top of things though, the reality is that both negative and positive behaviors should have already been dealt with or acknowledged in the moment they occurred so a deep rehashing during the review can be superfluous.

They often aren't a two-way street

If you know me at all, you know that I'm a big, big proponent of all sides having the chance to provide input and feedback. And that goes for performance reviews too. Sometimes employers can get so stuck on completing all of the objectives for each review and checking off each task or box that they can completely shut out any input from the employee.

Employee feedback should be a crucial and necessary component. If you don't have the time or make time to solicit that feedback, then you're not going to gain much buy-in from the employee.

They may damage morale

The culmination of each performance review often ends with a "rating." When you reduce your employees to a rating, something as impersonal as "good" or "satisfactory" or a "3 out of 5," you're sending the wrong message. You're telling your team that all of their efforts — the hours of time and energy they put in — have been reduced to a single solitary number or generic phrase. And unless you're a manager who can rally and unify their crew even when delivering tough news, this setup can lead to you unintentionally, sparking even more demoralization and hindering teamwork and creativity in the process.

A Better Alternative

Your employees crave and deserve regular feedback about their performance. What they don't want is for it to be a stressful event that doesn't garner any tangible and lasting benefits. And if the Millennial workforce has taught us anything, it's that being flexible and adapting our managerial style can net huge gains.

So if revamping your entire review process seems overwhelming, start by focusing on the following four things:

  1. Forego any type of rating system ASAP.
  2. Upon hire, sit down with each employee and establish customized and relevant short- and long-term goals.
  3. Then instead of having just one annual review, touch base with each employee on a weekly, biweekly, or monthly basis. For these to be effective, you'll need to rely heavily on your communication skills here and keep these conversations light, but focused, positive, and action-oriented. Go over the recent wins you've witnessed and tie that in with how that behavior has impacted the team and their personal goal progression. Discuss any other behaviors and actions that may inch them even closer to the finish line and use this time to adjust goals as needed too.
  4. Have a more in-depth performance conversation each quarter.


One Last Point

It's important to note that rigidity in this process can undo all of your efforts to transform from a performance review to a performance conversation dynamic. Because each employee may have different goals and require a range of goal timelines— and let's not forgot the mix of personalities, strengths, and weaknesses — you may need to touch base with each one at various frequencies. One employee may benefit from weekly check-ins while another may do well with only monthly chats.

If you have only one goal to set for yourself, let it be this: Treat each employee as the unique and valued person they are and focus on creating an open and ongoing dialogue with them. Do this and you'll be way ahead of the curve.

How do you conduct your performance reviews? What steps have you taken to modernize them?

Carrots and sticks: Future proof?

Tips

Carrots and sticks: Future proof?

How do you get people to perform certain actions, and more importantly, how to get them to do what you want them to do? At some point in your life, you’ve probably either asked yourself or have been the subject of this question. Most times we revert to the simplest of reasoning: You don’t get something for nothing. So this simple trade-based thesis results in a straightforward solution. You either give them something they want or give them something to fear.
Continue reading

How do you get people to perform certain actions, and more importantly, how to get them to do what you want them to do? At some point in your life, you’ve probably either asked yourself or have been the subject of this question. Most times we revert to the simplest of reasoning: You don’t get something for nothing. So this simple trade-based thesis results in a straightforward solution. You either give them something they want or give them something to fear.

👫 This post is aimed at
Anyone who is looking for a more theoretic and scientific explanation of how motivation works for employees.
📖 After reading
You'll be aware of the difference between hygiene and real motivators, and of how intuo plays into the hand of the latter.


Something about carrots and sticks

Allow me to paint you a picture, and introduce our protagonist in this shortest of stories: Jebediah, Jebby for short. Now, Jebby and his pet donkey, named Kong, lived several thousands of years ago, and he was quite the innovator back in his day. He lived a simple life, balancing work and wooing the ladies. Since Jebby wasn’t the Clooney/Pitt type, the latter took up a lot of his time. He needed more time to make some progress with the ladies, so he got to thinking. During work, slaving with bags and bags of harvested products, innovation-mode kicked in. By dangling a carrot in front of his donkey, Kong, he could make it go the way he wanted, and by using a stick, he could punish poor Kong for what was considered as bad behavior. Results! Kong was now slaving away, Jebby’s work got done a whole lot quicker, and many Jebediah Juniors were made.

This is basically what the carrot and stick idiom tells us, and what corporate thinking has since implemented as their main driver to get things done. You dangle a reward in front of a person, and/or threaten them with a punishment to induce good behavior. Just because I’m feeling it, I’m putting on my captain obvious costume: People are not donkeys. (Okay, I have met some people I kind of thought they were donkeys, but never like… physically a donkey.)

You can’t argue with results, and it’s clear that this method has been efficient. Kids have been taught right from wrong through a combination of candy and spanking. Men have been coerced to act certain ways with the lethal sex/no sex cocktail. Employees have gone the extra mile for a bigger paycheck, or in fear of getting fired. But is this the best way to motivate people?

Two-factor theory

Frederick Herzberg’s motivation-hygiene theory, also known as the two-factor theory, has a fascinating perspective on how to get the most out of your employees. His groundbreaking publication “One More Time, How Do You Motivate Employees?” dating back to 1968 is still very relevant, and one of the most requested articles from the Harvard Business Review. It revealed that true motivation is created through a combination of circumstances, rather than the simplified reward/punishment method.

The theory didn’t steal its name, as it distinguishes two sets of factors. According to Herzberg, and contrary to general belief, both factors are independent phenomena that do not affect each other. A decrease in dissatisfaction does not lead to an increase in satisfaction. This has major implications on how to motivate your employees. Traditionally speaking, carrot-and-sticking, you would think that by paying attention to keeping the dissatisfying factors maintained, motivation would ensue. Easy example: A higher salary or rather a sweeter carrot or a sharper stick equals higher motivation.

Dissatisfying factors are also referred to as hygiene factors, as they do not cause motivation but solely cause dissatisfaction. To avoid this from happening, they need to be eliminated. For example, make sure reasonable and fair wages are paid and job security is ensured. These are mostly extrinsic to the work itself. This is right up Jebby’s alley, but these rewards are only half the work.

Satisfying factors were more Freddy’s thing, and make up the other half. He believed this was what could trigger and maintain real motivation. Intrinsic to work itself, they possess the ability to motivate people at work and thus lead to higher performance.

His publication also suggested several ideas on how to trigger these motivators.

  • Increase employee autonomy = Decrease management’s control.
  • Create complete and natural work units where this is possible.
  • Provide direct, regular and continuous feedback on productivity and job performance.
  • Encourage employees to take on new and challenging tasks, and become experts.

This is not an exhaustive list, but what becomes clear is that to get real motivation the answer cannot be found through simple rewards. This goes against what we believe, or at least it caught me a bit off guard. You give something, you get something in return.

The motivational puzzle

As I mentioned before, this neanderthal-model has had and is having success. My research quickly led me to Daniel Pink. After finishing law school, mister Pink has been devoting his life to studying the motivation puzzle in people. I strongly encourage you to watch his inspiring TED-talk, but while you’re here I’ll shed some light on what I consider to be the main takeaway: “There is a mismatch between what science knows, and business does”.

Extrinsic motivators work well for so-called 20th-century tasks. This industrial era came with pretty simple tasks, but today more and more complex tasks and are needed and expected. This complexity requires creative thinking and rewards work contra-productive. They narrow your focus, and this tunnel-vision does not allow you to see the solution. Solutions are now found a lot more in the “periphery” rather than in your focused view.

Science has proven the inefficiency of creating motivation through these carrots and sticks in complex tasks over and over again, yet corporations are still employing this strategy. (Mr. Pink discusses this at length) A part of the reason for its success can be explained by the fact that the principles are as simple as ABC. As I’ve tried to explain in this blog, true motivation cannot be found through merely handing out rewards. There are however a few things we can keep in mind to achieve the best results.

Modern psychology uses three pillars to boost intrinsic motivation:

  • Autonomy - the desire to direct our own lives.
  • Mastery - the urge to get better, or develop skills.
  • Purpose - the need to do what we do for reasons bigger than ourselves.

intuo as the vehicle of change

At intuo we firmly believe in these three pillars. Changing towards a company that can tackle these three components is not an easy task, and we believe our platform can be the vehicle of change. By helping you focus on coaching, through continuous feedback and frequent one-on-one’s, we can support employees in their search for Mastery. Aligning personal objectives, with the company’s strategy focuses on finding purpose. Giving them the reigns to their career allows you to step away from top-down management, and move towards empowered employees.

It worked for my man Jebby, and it has worked for years, but that’s irrelevant. When it comes to down to it, there’s only one question you should be asking yourself: “Is this still working for me?”.

Job titles are so 2016

Strategy & Solution

Job titles are so 2016

Here is a love story. My mom and dad crossed paths in an SME when they were admin and sales executives. They fell in love and got married, with a picture of them building their careers in the company together, climbing the corporate ladder. Changing to another job was never part of their plans. 23 years later, most of their plans have come to pass. They got promoted over and over again.
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Here is a love story. My mom and dad crossed paths in an SME 23 years ago when they were admin and sales executives. Back then securing a job at a multinational company or an SME was almost equal to signing a life-long contract. Stability and security were key. They fell in love and got married, with a picture of them building their careers in the company together, climbing the corporate ladder. Changing to another job was never part of their plans. 23 years later, most of their plans have come to pass. Other than giving birth to a beautiful daughter (who obviously is shamelessly writing this blog post), they got promoted over and over again, securing more wealth and power in the company until now, as they are reaching the retirement age.

👫 This post is aimed at
Anyone who wants to think and act proactively when it comes to the future of the way of working.
📖 After reading
You'll have a short overview of the most common challenges that this future will bring.


Okay, now you realize I’m not exactly telling a love story, but rather stating a common phenomenon shared by our parents’ generation. Today, as the millennials gradually take over the workplace, the trend of staying at one company with a secured position starts to vanish. In fact, 91% of the millennials anticipate staying at any given job for less than three years. We just do not see ourselves working at one company for a lifetime because the world is just so big out there. We do not always want to be confined in the routine, so job hopping has become the new trend. It is not about commitment but priorities. Being challenged and getting different kinds of experiences are our priorities.

If job hopping is the trend of today, have you thought about the trend of tomorrow?

It will no longer be the job titles that attract people, but the projects or tasks themselves, all taking place within a certain culture. The nature of employment changes, driven by the choices available to both employers and employees. The majority of the employees desire more freedom and flexible working hours and at the same time, the thrill of embarking on different projects. Employers can benefit from this; hiring the most suitable team for the each project, without having to worry about skill fit and long-term engagements. As a result, companies, and HR need to be prepared to handle a situation whereby employees are working for different companies at the same time.

While such employment situation makes the hiring of talents more efficient, it imposes problems to companies at the same time.

  1. Aligning personal goals and team goals

    When an employee is only going to stay with the company for three months for one project, it might be too short a time to let him fully understand the organization's values and goals. It is even more challenging to align his personal goals with the company's, let alone his loyalty to the company.

  2. Engaging the extended workforce

    While companies invest in engaging their long-term employees, the temporary workers or project staff might just be neglected because the Return on Investment is comparatively much lower. However, even for short-term projects, engaged employees are productive employees. Engaging them and connecting them to the rest of the workforce is crucial to capture their best value.

  3. Matching talents to projects

    Imagine, interviews have to be conducted regularly to hire project team members. Not only is the process tedious, but it is also not always easy to find the best fit for a certain project. Such cost efficiency leads to many other operational inefficiencies.

How can intuo help with this?

As a talent management tool, intuo looks into the future world of work and help you manage your temporary and full-time workers on a single platform.

intuo supports agile goal setting which allows employees to set short-term objectives and align them with the team objectives. Also, through continuous 360-degree feedback and praises, they can to stay engaged, even if it is only for the duration of the project. Most importantly, intuo is not only concerned about keeping a person at a company but also keeping them motivated and happy even if they are at another company. With the people’s skills and past experiences being restored in intuo's system, it would be much easier for employers to find people that match the skill sets required for the projects.

Prepare yourself for the future of HR with intuo, today!

The solution for Comp & Ben

Strategy & Solution

The solution for Comp & Ben

Let’s break this up into the familiar parts: Why, how, what. I’m not going to waste a lot of time writing an introduction because you’ll skip it anyway. Just wanted to note that this post won’t give you the final answer, but it will help you a whole lot if you’re willing to put in some mental work.
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Let’s break this up into the familiar parts: Why, how, what. I’m not going to waste a lot of time writing an introduction because you’ll skip it anyway. That’s also why the picture of a lion a bit further down below is also completely irrelevant. Just had to grab attention. Just wanted to note that this post won’t give you the final answer, but it will help you a whole lot if you’re willing to put in some mental work.

👫 This post is aimed at
HR-minded people who are in charge or are very much involved with compensation & benefits.
📖 After reading
You will be able to set up a stronger and more future-proof com & ben model.


Why — the value proposition

When designing a compensation strategy, this is honestly the most important question to ask. And I don’t mean you should ask yourself “why do we need a compensation strategy?”- I mean, duh. But ask: “Why would people really want to work for us?”. In other words, what’s our employee value proposition? And not the soft-marketing kind, but really your employer strategy. There’s a simple (≠ easy) strategy exercise that looks much like the layout of this blog post that’s called “Who, what, how”. Ask your HR team to really think about these questions: Who do we want to attract? What will be our value proposition? How will we deliver on that value proposition? For example, for us at INTUO it looks very much like this: 

Who? Independent, ambitious people with a great sense of purpose that have tremendous growth potential (regardless of age)

What? More impact, ownership, and growth than elsewhere.

How? By growing faster than average companies, we’ll need them to grow fast with us and take up roles and responsibilities they wouldn’t get elsewhere. Learning by doing (and by making mistakes). That and we have an appealing mission statement.

Grooowl (if you didn't read the intro, you won't get this)

How

Once you’ve defined your employer strategy, you can now derive more or less how you want to reward them. Firstly take into account these basic principles before answering the questions below.

  • Payment is all about perceived fairness. That’s actually the only important thing. If everyone feels like they’re paid in a fair manner, nobody will leave and everybody will do their job. It is NOT about motivation or about rewarding (despite the name). It’s about fairness, and fairness alone. Take for example the story of Gravity, the company that decided to pay everyone $70.000 (the limit after which the correlation between money and happiness is not that obvious anymore). Quite soon after launching that strategy, two high-performers quit, because, even though they made more than they used to, they felt like other people around them were not entitled to the same pay they had. It felt unfair.
  • Pay according to value, not performance

  • Laszlo Bock wrote: "pay unfairly". What he meant was: pay unequally (and I don’t mean based on someone’s gender). And that’s completely true. You shouldn’t be afraid to pay people that have tremendous value for your company a whole lot more than others. Others that work with them will most likely understand and won’t even mind. Paradoxically this actually increases the perceived fairness. The only difficulty is that on average, most people think they perform better than average. Just like most drivers think they can drive better than average. So if you can double check the top-performer identification with an HR Business Partner or with a team, please do.
  • Finally, remember that paying for value is more important than paying for performance. Unless it’s a bonus, a bonus can be used as a motivator or rewarding tool, but only in the right scenarios where input and output are clearly linked (e.g. sales, top management, simple tasks...). If you pay for performance instead of value, the following happens: Marie has been working hard all year and get’s a performance score of 4 out of 5. Even though she’s one of the few that got a 4 (let alone a 5), she still feels like she’s given it all she’s got this year and gets the feeling the company doesn’t appreciate her efforts all that much. And it’s not just about the score, it’s about the fact that you expect a pay-raise instead of a job-well-done. Recognition should be done in the form of compliments, exposure, and pats-on-the-back, not in the form of a salary increase or a performance score.

Right, so here are some questions for you to answer. Do not start thinking about all the details already, just answer with one to three sentences:

  • What do we want to reward for? Hint: It should be based on value rather than performance if it's about a fixed salary.
  • How will we pay compared to external benchmarks? Will you pay at 110% of someone’s capabilities or rather at 90%. At a startup, you usually pay under the average, because you can offer an amazing learning opportunity.
  • Who do we want to give a bonus? Is it group-based or individual? Take into account that individual bonuses only work if the input is tightly connected to the output. Also, a bonus system should be strictly agreed upon beforehand. You don’t want any confusion about it.
Pay fairly first and foremost

What

Finally, let’s design your payment strategy. The idea of this exercise is to give you a framework and let you combine some elements to come to a payment-track. The combination of payment-tracks can make up your payment strategy. This is the framework. There are five decisions to make:

  • Who: Who is it for?
  • What: What will we take into account when making the decision?
  • Input: Who will deliver that input?
  • Final Say: Who will have the final say?
  • Type: What type of payment-device do we wish to hand out. Points can be used to trade in for a bigger car or maybe another training (as a way to represent the flexible income plan).

Now the only thing you have to do is write down between one and five tracks that will cover your entire rewarding strategy. Check whether they meet your strategy, the general conditions, and your earlier decisions. If not, reiterate again. You can add other things like a car-upgrade in "Type" or top-performers in "Who". Go wild on your ideas, but try to keep the end result simple. And don’t forget to mention the frequency of your adjustments.

The framework for designing compensation tracks

The Old School

You’ll pay for performance mostly, put everyone through the same system and give managers the opportunity to hide behind that same system. “I can’t help it that they made me force rank on you”. Usually, they have a bonus for top-management as well, that’s administered by HR, but set by the business.

Classical, old school payment structure

The New School

In a lot of self-steering organizations, people can choose what responsibilities to take up for the coming year and will get paid out points if they can deliver on those responsibilities. HR/CEO is the one valuing the responsibilities.

One type of self-steering compensation process

The Simple School

You give everyone a group bonus and do special stuff for the top and bottom 10%. Focus on paying fair by looking at someone’s market value, but do something out of the ordinary for the top-performers and low-performers.

The simple rewarding strategy

The Consulting School

Where everyone is paid fairly compared to market value, but some people move up the consulting ladder because they show more value. A case can be prepared with the coach every quarter and is then presented to a committee of top-managers and HR that decide over promotions. Both the coach and the committee know what to look for in a consultant to see them move to the next level. If the committee’s decision was negative, the person can still prepare a new case for next quarter, because they will receive concrete action points.

The consulting way

The Management School

This is a typical scenario where the manager gets more responsibility in deciding how to divide their pay increases. Finance first gives a budget to HR, HR then assigns that to managers and does a suggestion for pay increase (based on data they received from other managers (performance snapshots) and sometimes the team as well). The manager decides how to divide it.

Where the manager gets bigger responsibility

intuo is not a comp&ben consultant, but we realize the importance of having all these operational factors on point. We have accumulated a lot of real-life experiences from several of our customers that managed to tackle this issue and then improve their culture with our tool. Talk with us and find out how they did it.


This article was originally published on the Medium account of Arne Van Damme

Extend the engagement of your extended workforce

Tips

Extend the engagement of your extended workforce

The extended (or contingent) workforce are the people in your company that work for you but are not actually your employees. We’re talking about interns staying only for a short period, freelancers working project-based and remotes executing their assignments without actually being present in the office. This new type of workforce also implies different relationships with these employees. For companies to stay agile regarding this changing work trend, organizations will have to find nimble ways to keep these non-traditional workers engaged!
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The extended (or contingent) workforce are the people in your company that work for you but are not actually your employees. We’re talking about interns staying only for a short period, freelancers working project-based and remotes executing their assignments without actually being present in the office. This new type of workforce also implies different relationships with these employees. For companies to stay agile regarding this changing work trend, organizations will have to find nimble ways to keep these non-traditional workers engaged!

The concept of Employee Engagement has been around since the 1990s and is being severely challenged. It’s becoming more and more difficult, to keep one’s finger on the pulse for every employee. By now it’s considered to be a normal feature for companies to be working with remotes, temporary workers, interns and freelancers (the so-called contingent workforce). So how can you keep track of their engagement within the company, when they are not really within the company?

👫 This post is aimed at
Teamleaders who are challenged by the increasing extended workforce "phenomenon."
📖 After reading
You will have a better understanding of where to begin to deal with this challenge.


  1. Facilitate easy onboarding

    When you’re hiring new people to join your company under the form of an extended worker, a proper onboarding will be even more key than in the traditional working format. You need to find fast, effective ways to get those contingent workers up to speed with the values of the organization and overall integrate them into the right team, without losing too much time. This is exactly what Talmundo does. They offer a seamless onboarding experience for new employees, which might be just what you need when you’re working with contingent workers.

    When they join a certain team, they must stay up to date with the objectives and the mission of their team, in order to be working in the right direction. This is not possible when the objectives are communicated or set only once per year. Make these objectives agile, flexible and visible for the widespread workers. This advice really goes for all employees in general, regardless if they’re contingent.

    If you make an effort to make this onboarding as smooth as possible, the extended workforce will feel more like a part of the team from the start. This initial feeling of inclusiveness can be the foundation of an engaged worker.

  2. Download our white paper for free!

  3. Communication and managing your talent

    The extended workforce can be easily forgotten in the day to day business of an organization. They are often excluded from certain meetings or even company activities, without a clear reason. Contingent workers can easily be included in meetings via the numerous communication tools out there.

    To include them more, you can additionally provide the right collaboration tools for the contingent workers, so their absence from the office isn’t considered a roadblock anymore. Set up a portal where they are being kept in the loop of day-to-day activities and the progress on the projects, where they can access all the necessary documents and material needed. An example of such a tool is Slack, where you can easily stay in touch with your colleagues.

    When you’re introducing such a tool, the interaction points with the permanent and temporary staff will become more frequent and the engagement will rise accordingly. This is exactly what INTUO is all about. INTUO allows you to track this engagement of all the people in your company, both internal and external.

  4. Build multi-skilled supporting entities

    Being a contingent worker is often referred to as a lonely job. They are at risk of feeling unsupported and might not really be fully committed to a team or an organization. That’s why it’s important to offer them the right support.

    As an organization, you can easily assemble a team of people that carry the responsibility for supporting the extended workforce. Curate your people selection carefully, so you have a mixed team with various skills and knowledge. These people should be able to help them out with paperwork, social activities, job-related backing, and regular one-on-ones to check-in with their progress and well-being.

    They will be the go-to contacts for your extended workforce and it will be their responsibility to involve and support them in as many ways possible and monitor the engagement levels.

INTUO is a non-intruisive tool that can support you and your contingent workers in these changing work trends. Get in touch and extend the performance of your extended workforce!

Human Resources surveys tell us the creation of a great employee experience ranks as a major trend again this year. They also acknowledge that only a minority of companies have found a way of doing it well.

There are plenty of reasons why companies struggle to differentiate their employee experience, such as:

  • A failure to align that experience to their external brand promise
  • A disproportionate focus on recruitment and a neglect of the numerous touch points once they join
  • Misaligned people processes emanating from siloed centers of HR expertise

But I believe there is one obvious flaw in our thinking – we fail to see our employees as we do our customers. We try and design an employee experience – one employee experience – that can be run at scale. Whereas what we want as employees is our own experience. Designed around me, my needs, my wants, my aspirations, not a “one-size-fits-all” experience.

When we enter the workplace, personalization ends.

In our life outside work, we now expect and enjoy a level of personalization. We can edit our news apps to only get the stories we’re interested in, we produce our own radio stations through our Spotify playlists, we can pre-set our car seat to our preferred driving position. Psychology Today reports that we like the feeling that personalization gives us and a recent study at the University of Texas shows that we are more likely to engage with content tailored to our needs. And it seems to work. Some 35% of Amazon sales and 75% of Netflix views come from customised recommendations.

Yet when we enter the workplace, that personalization ends.

Employment contracts, induction programs, performance and talent management, leadership competency models, training programs, reward frameworks - standardized, universally applied, one-size-fits-all. While this approach suits the organization because it’s cheaper to implement and easier to monitor, we are kidding ourselves that it creates a great employee experience. A truly positive employee experience is one where I feel special and appreciated for my individual contribution and talents, not simply a cog in a machine.

Lucy Adams, CEO at Disruptive HR & Ex-HR Director at the BBC

At Disruptive HR we asked over 450 HR professionals about how they deliver induction, performance, reward etc. to see whether they provide a customised or one-size-fits-all approach. (You can check out how you fare here). Over 70% of the responses stated the latter, suggesting that the vast majority of us have a long way to go if we are to offer an enhanced employee experience.

So what could a consumer approach look like for employees?

Here are some examples of how companies are trying to create, not just AN employee experience – but MY employee experience.

Using Consumer Marketing techniques at Virgin Trains (UK)

Virgin Trains asked their market research department how they would go about assessing and segmenting their 3,500 employees. Instead of taking the traditional approach, they looked at aspects such as social media preferences, traditional media consumption, learning biases, and so on. Called the “Amazing Colleague Experience”, and it went far deeper than any employee engagement survey. All of the rich data was then used to inform the creation of meaningful, employee-driven initiatives.

Onboarding Individuals at Wipro

Many companies still see the induction or onboarding period as a process to put people through. It typically involves a vanilla offering of a week of PowerPoint slides crammed with bullet points from all the departments who have managed to crowbar their way onto it. It’s about conformity, it’s about telling them what we want them to know. The smarter companies see it differently and use it as a time to learn about the new hires and find out how they can best be welcomed and deployed. Wipro uses the onboarding process to find out more about the new employee’s unique perspectives and strengths leading to 33% greater retention in the first six months.

Personalised Rewards

The annual, bureaucratic, net-after-tax bonus never inspires as much joy as that hand-written card or the thoughtful and personalized gift. Lots of companies are beginning to stretch their imaginations when it comes to the role of reward in creating the employee experience. Whether it’s having employees reward their peers for being supportive and fostering collaboration like at NextJump. Or it could be giving thoughtful gifts to employees on their birthdays like at German social gaming firm Wooga. Or, perhaps, rewarding the team through off-site activities that they share like at GoDaddy. The future of rewards is all about the personal, the timely, the unexpected.

Tailoring talent management at Starbucks

The HR analytics team at Starbucks decided to take a marketing approach to uncover what attracted, retained and motivated employees. They found three clusters: “skiers,” who work mainly to support other passions; “artists,” who desire a community-oriented and socially responsible employer; and “careerists,” who want long-term career advancement. The clusters helped managers’ better tailor programs to multiple sets of employee needs.


Creating a great employee experience starts with seeing your employees as consumers, not applying uniform processes, no matter how “best in class” they are.

Do you wear your job as a fancy dress, or as comfy sweatpants?

Strategy & Solution

Do you wear your job as a fancy dress, or as comfy sweatpants?

All the ladies out there (don’t worry this is not a gender-biased post, all the gentlemen could probably relate to it in one way or another), have you ever bought that dress you’d been longing for months which made you feel so gorgeous and elegant that you proudly called it your favorite dress? Don’t tell me you’ve never had such moments. I refuse to believe it.
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All the ladies out there (don’t worry this is not a gender-biased post, all the gentlemen could probably relate to it in one way or another), have you ever bought that dress you’d been longing for months which made you feel so gorgeous and elegant that you proudly called it your favorite dress? Don’t tell me you’ve never had such moments. I refuse to believe it.

But the question is, is it still your favorite piece of clothing today? Does it still give you the same kind of warm fuzzy feeling when you put it on and look at yourself in the mirror?

Well, I wouldn’t possibly know everyone’s answer.

But, The same dress that gave me the I-am-the-most-pretty-girl-in-the-world feeling a year ago sits quietly in my wardrobe now, waiting to be overlooked at least once a month. It no longer satisfies my innate craving for feeling good, so I always want another dress, then another dress… However, I do have my favorite pair of sweatpants that I’ve owned for five years, and I just cannot get enough of the comfort and feeling of home it gives me. So now -this might be a longshot- let’s bring this analogy to our jobs and talk about the level of happiness your job can offer you.

When you achieve the monthly goals you set for yourself, when you successfully hit the sales target, or when you finally launch the mobile application that you’ve been developing for months, you feel the sense of accomplishment and are filled with joy. All of your friends and relatives who notice this would think that your job makes you feel so good. However, it is actually not your job that is making you happy, but it's you who is doing a good job.

It's about you, not the job.

Just like how that dress looks very elegant and gorgeous on its own, you call it your favorite dress because of the way it feels when you're in it.

Shopping for the best possible jobs around.

Back to your job. Come one week later, that happiness starts to fade away again because you will have to focus on new projects or tasks, and of course repeat the cycle of short-term happiness all over again. The truth is, you can experience the same level of happiness by accomplishing a task in almost every other company, so what is the reason that makes you stay with a particular organization?

At the end of the day, the comfy sweatpants always win it from the fancy dress.

Everyone needs that pair of comfy pants; everyone needs a job in which they feel comfortable. Some of your friends might look good wearing the job they are wearing, but do they actually love wearing it? Some do, some don't.

If you are a CEO or a manager of a company, of course, you want your employees to have those short-term periods of happiness because of a job-well-done. But it's far more important to make sure your wardrobe is well-equipped with super comfortable pieces that add to your work environment. Because in that work environment, employees will find it easier to do a good job. And once they find something that fits them perfectly, they will not need to shop around as much. Nobody throws away their pair of perfectly comfy sweatpants.

But enough with the play on words.


  1. Give them the recognition they deserve

    Giving your people praises and recognition for their efforts makes them not only feel good about themselves but also about their organization as a whole. People feel appreciated, are motivated to do great work, and as a result, the company benefits from it. A healthy cycle of high-quality work and motivation contributes to the overall engagement.

  2. Autonomy is key

    A lot of people thrive when they are given the freedom to do things their own way. Letting them enjoy the whole process and giving them autonomy encourages their creativity and motivation to bring you better quality work.

  3. Instill in them a sense of purpose

    People get excited when they realize they are contributing to something bigger and greater. If they can see themselves achieving something in your company, they will be fueled with excitement and motivation to deliver a lot more.

Want to bring the ultimate employee experience to your team and make them feel good about the job they are having now? Let us know, we can be of great help!

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